hawaiian islands: lifeguard legends

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lifeguard legends (00:11:21)

The lifeguards of the North Shore of Oahu are the modern day sheriffs of the wild west. This film pays tribute to their selfless acts of heroism. A must see for all surf lovers!

  • grant: $100,000 - North Shore Lifeguard Association

    To fulfill the need for ocean safety and lifesaving education within the North Shore community.

  • grant: $125,000 - Eddie Aikau Foundation

    To promote education and the advancement of Hawaiian culture and to support the expansion of the annual student essay contest, creation of a post-secondary school scholarship program, beach clean-ups, and development of revenue-generating products. Grants between 2008-2011.

  • grant: $325,000 - Hawaiian Lifeguard Association

    To support the enhancement of ocean life saving and rescue, and providing public information and education. Grants between 2009-2011.

  • topic: surfing

  • location: oahu

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hawaiian islands: lifeguard legends

During the shortest days of the year, hundreds of gray seals clamber onto Seal Island for an extraordinary mass breeding event. At this second largest of just four U.S. colonies, the seals come ashore for just a few weeks to give birth and feed their pups. The 300 pound females have one pup per year, with the peak of births in mid January. At birth, the compelling pups are dressed in a suit of thick, white fur (lanugo) which they begin molting at about three weeks of age.

Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge is a 65 acre sanctuary managed in collaboration with the Audubon Seabird Restoration Program (Project Puffin), which operates a summer field station here. The program has successfully restored Maine’s largest colonies of Atlantic Puffins and Common and Arctic Terns. From May through August, the seabirds can be viewed on live cameras operated by explore.org.

For over 200 years Seal Island was also a summer campsite for fishermen harvesting herring, cod, lobster. Excessive seabird hunting for food and feathers led to the loss of the puffin colony here. From the 1940s to 1960s the Navy used the island as a bombing target. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acquired the island in 1972. The island is closed to public landing because of the unexploded ordnance and unique wildlife. Today, seals face new threats including entanglement in fishing gear, chemical and plastic pollution and illegal hunting. They are protected by the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972.

about

location: Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge, Maine

best viewing hours: 10:00am - 3:00pm (Dec to mid-Feb)

time zone: Eastern Time

related links: Project Puffin and Adopt-A-Puffin
Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge
Northeast Fisheries Science Center
Riverhead Foundation

The lifeguards of the North Shore of Oahu are the modern day sheriffs of the wild west. This film pays tribute to their selfless acts of heroism. A must see for all surf lovers!

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