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alaska - pacific walrus cam - beach view

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alaska - pacific walrus cam - beach view

Main Beach is a long, concave beach extending from the northern tip of Round Island and the primary walrus “haul-out” location; the greatest numbers of Pacific Walruses should be visible along this beach. Look up along the cliffs for nesting seabirds, and out to sea for other marine mammals such as whales, sea lions and seals.

Walrus Facts

Walruses are part of the pinniped family which includes flippered marine mammals like sea lions and seals. There are two subspecies of walrus: the Pacific Walrus and the Atlantic Walrus. Explore.org's live walrus cam is based in the Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary (WISGS) in the waters of Bristol Bay, Alaska, and therefore shows live video of Pacific Walruses.

Walruses are characterized by brown or pink hides, large bodies, thick blubber, long whiskers, and of course, their massive ivory tusks.

A walrus's tusks--which can grow up to 3 feet--are used for a variety of reasons such as digging up the ocean floor in search of clams, hauling themselves onto ice sheets, defense against polar bears and showing aggression towards other walruses. A walruses whiskers are highly sensitive and are also used for searching for food on the sea floor.

Walruses are extraordinarily large animals; fully-grown male walruses are called "bulls" and can weigh up to 4,000 pounds, while females are small but can still weigh up to 2,000 pounds. Thick blubber insulates their bodies from the cold arctic water, ice and air.

Walruses are social animals and rest, or "haul-out", on ice or rocky island outcroppings between feeds. Our walrus cam observes Main Beach on the northern reaches of Round Island, which is one of the four major terrestrial haul-outs in Alaska and is managed by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.  The long, concave beach is an excellent haul-out location for walruses, but also serves as a habitat for seabirds and other marine mammals. As many as 14,000 walruses can be observed here during a single season.

Bull walruses return to Round Island every spring as the ice melts and stay in Bristol Bay to feed.

  • topic: walrus

  • location: round island

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walrus facts and camera information

logo for Alaska fish and game on walrus cam

The goal of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is to manage fisheries and game units while also educating the public about Alaska's natural environment.

Created in 1960, The Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary (WISGS) protects one of the largest gathering places in the world for Pacific Walruses. In addition to walruses, WISGS is also home to sea lions, seabirds and other marine mammals and birds.

The most popular haul-out in the WISGS is Round Island, where our walrus cam is located on Main Beach. Please enjoy watching up to 15,000 of these massive marine mammals with Explore's live video feed from walrus cam.

about

location: Round Island, Alaska

best hours: 6:30am - 10:30pm (May through August)

time zone: Alaska Daylight Time

links: State Game Sanctuary
Get Involved In Walrus Research
Marine Mammals Management
Pacific Walrus Range Map

Main Beach is a long, concave beach extending from the northern tip of Round Island and the primary walrus “haul-out” location; the greatest numbers of Pacific Walruses should be visible along this beach. Look up along the cliffs for nesting seabirds, and out to sea for other marine mammals such as whales, sea lions and seals.

Walrus Facts

Walruses are part of the pinniped family which includes flippered marine mammals like sea lions and seals. There are two subspecies of walrus: the Pacific Walrus and the Atlantic Walrus. Explore.org's live walrus cam is based in the Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary (WISGS) in the waters of Bristol Bay, Alaska, and therefore shows live video of Pacific Walruses.

Walruses are characterized by brown or pink hides, large bodies, thick blubber, long whiskers, and of course, their massive ivory tusks.

A walrus's tusks--which can grow up to 3 feet--are used for a variety of reasons such as digging up the ocean floor in search of clams, hauling themselves onto ice sheets, defense against polar bears and showing aggression towards other walruses. A walruses whiskers are highly sensitive and are also used for searching for food on the sea floor.

Walruses are extraordinarily large animals; fully-grown male walruses are called "bulls" and can weigh up to 4,000 pounds, while females are small but can still weigh up to 2,000 pounds. Thick blubber insulates their bodies from the cold arctic water, ice and air.

Walruses are social animals and rest, or "haul-out", on ice or rocky island outcroppings between feeds. Our walrus cam observes Main Beach on the northern reaches of Round Island, which is one of the four major terrestrial haul-outs in Alaska and is managed by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.  The long, concave beach is an excellent haul-out location for walruses, but also serves as a habitat for seabirds and other marine mammals. As many as 14,000 walruses can be observed here during a single season.

Bull walruses return to Round Island every spring as the ice melts and stay in Bristol Bay to feed.

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