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underwater bear cam - katmai national park, alaska

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underwater bear cam - katmai national park, alaska

Every summer, the instinct to reproduce drives hundreds of thousands of sockeye salmon up the Naknek and Brooks Rivers to the spawning grounds of Brooks Lake. The salmon remarkably return to the same rivers and lakes where they hatched as small frys.

Salmon begin to enter the mouth of the Brooks River in early June, but it's not until late June that the sockeye arrive in large numbers. The peak of the sockeye salmon run is in early July.

As viewers of the live underwater salmon camera will see, the fish undergo extreme changes in their physiology as they enter the Brooks River to spawn. They develop humps on their backs, and their teeth and jaws grow longer. They become more red in color and their bones soften.

Once the salmon enter the Naknek river (and later the Brooks River) from Bristol Bay, they stop feeding entirely. Instead, they get energy by absorbing their scales and body fat.

Once the salmon reach the lake or river where they will spawn, the females will lay around 4,000 eggs in a nesting site. The males then fight each other in an attempt to fertilize the eggs.

In the fall, once the adult salmon have spawned, they will begin to die. By November, snow and ice starts to creep in and the bears will have left to find a winter denning site.

The salmon eggs will watch in the winter, and the salmon fry will live in the lake or river for a whole year before attempting the journey to the ocean.

For more information about the salmon run in the Naknek River watershed please visit this article on National Parks Service's website.

  • grant: $150,000 - Katmai National Park and Preserve

    To provide salary support and equipment for a seasonal media ranger position, to support educational programming and the brown bear webcams, and for ongoing interpretive activities

  • topic: brown bears

  • location: brooks camp - falls

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live underwater fish camera

river watch cam katmai national park logo

Learn More & Get Involved · Katmai National Park and Preserve
Mounted on the floating bridge over Brooks River, this cam provides an unprecedented view of migrating salmon and bears "snorkeling" for them, above the water.

about

location: Katmai National Park & Preserve, AK

best hours: 10:00am - 6:30pm

time zone: Alaska Daylight Time

links: Bearcam FAQ
KSU Brown Bear Survey
Bears of Brooks River eBook
Katmai National Park and Preserve

grants

NGO: Katmai National Park and Preserve

grant: $150,000

location: Brooks Camp - Falls

mission: To provide salary support and equipment for a seasonal media ranger position, to support educational programming and the brown bear webcams, and for ongoing interpretive activities

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Every summer, the instinct to reproduce drives hundreds of thousands of sockeye salmon up the Naknek and Brooks Rivers to the spawning grounds of Brooks Lake. The salmon remarkably return to the same rivers and lakes where they hatched as small frys.

Salmon begin to enter the mouth of the Brooks River in early June, but it's not until late June that the sockeye arrive in large numbers. The peak of the sockeye salmon run is in early July.

As viewers of the live underwater salmon camera will see, the fish undergo extreme changes in their physiology as they enter the Brooks River to spawn. They develop humps on their backs, and their teeth and jaws grow longer. They become more red in color and their bones soften.

Once the salmon enter the Naknek river (and later the Brooks River) from Bristol Bay, they stop feeding entirely. Instead, they get energy by absorbing their scales and body fat.

Once the salmon reach the lake or river where they will spawn, the females will lay around 4,000 eggs in a nesting site. The males then fight each other in an attempt to fertilize the eggs.

In the fall, once the adult salmon have spawned, they will begin to die. By November, snow and ice starts to creep in and the bears will have left to find a winter denning site.

The salmon eggs will watch in the winter, and the salmon fry will live in the lake or river for a whole year before attempting the journey to the ocean.

For more information about the salmon run in the Naknek River watershed please visit this article on National Parks Service's website.

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