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west coast sea nettles - jellyfish cam

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west coast sea nettles - jellyfish cam

The live jellyfish cam at the Aquarium of the Pacific features West Coast Sea Nettles.

Sea Nettles are a genus of jellyfish called Chrysaora. They are popular in aquariums because they are fairly easy to maintain and their beautiful colors coupled with their slow-moving propulsion make them relaxing to observe.

About Jellyfish

Jellyfish are invertebrates that inhabit ocean environments and are one of the oldest species of animals. They have inhabited the world’s oceans for millions of years and even pre-date dinosaurs.

Jellyfish get their name from a jelly-like body, which is generally shaped like a bell. Suspended from the body are tentacles, which vary in number and size from species to species.

Many species of jellyfish have stingers present on their tentacles that they use as self-defense and to trap their prey. The stingers are often toxic and render the prey immobile. The prey is then passed up along the length of the tentacles and is fed into a small opening at the bottom of the bell-shaped body.

Jellyfish Range

Jellyfish are found in every ocean in the world and are mainly passive drifters, meaning they do not actively control their destination. Although they can propel themselves for short distances, they do not possess the power to control their direction for long distances. The sea nettles seen on this jellyfish cam can be found on the coastlines of Oregon, California and Baja Mexico.

Jellyfish Stings

Jellyfish catch their prey using stinging cells called nematocysts. When these special cells come in contact with another animal, they explode and send a lance into the victim. The lance then injects venom into the blood stream.

The effect of jellyfish venom on humans varies greatly from species to species. Some jellyfish stings are hardly noticeable by humans, while others leave a red rash and a mild pain. Some jellies, like the box jellyfish found off the coast of the Philippines and Australia, are deadly.

Vinegar is a common home remedy used to treat jellyfish stings on humans. The vinegar, which is about 5% acidic, neutralizes the nematocysts before they can inject venom into the skin.

Jellyfish Reproduction

Jellyfish have two stages in their life cycle: the “polyp” stage and the “medusa” stage. The large, colorful jellyfish you see on the live jellyfish cam are in the medusa stage.

During reproduction, when jellyfish sperm fertilizes an egg, a planula is formed. The planula is similar to a larva and floats in the ocean until it attaches to the sea floor, plant, coral or another undersea structure. The planula then becomes a polyp, which looks something like a sea anemone; a stalky body with tentacles that face upwards.

As they grow, the jellyfish polyp eventually detaches from the structure and enters the medusa stage. In this stage, their tentacles hang down from their body.

  • grant: $468,000 - Aquarium of the Pacific

    To support the Aquarium’s educational programs and research projects.

  • topic: marine life

  • location: long beach

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about the live jellyfish cam

Jellyfish Cam Aquarium of the pacific logo

You are watching the live jellyfish camera and seeing magnificent west coast sea nettles in the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach. West coast sea nettles are a type of jelly, an invertebrate made up mostly of water. Jellies have no heart, brain or bones. They swim by jet propulsion; by expanding then quickly contracting, water is forced away from its bell-shaped body, pushing the jelly in the opposite direction. The aquarium has successfully cultured this species for many years and often shares the jellies with other aquariums. It takes about three months to rear the jellies from polyps to ephyrae, the adult stage.

Related Links Sea Nettles

about

location: Long Beach, CA

best hours: 7:30am - 9:00pm

time zone: Pacific Time

links: Questions & Answers

grants

NGO: Aquarium of the Pacific

grant: $468,000

location: Long Beach

mission: To support the Aquarium’s educational programs and research projects.

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The live jellyfish cam at the Aquarium of the Pacific features West Coast Sea Nettles.

Sea Nettles are a genus of jellyfish called Chrysaora. They are popular in aquariums because they are fairly easy to maintain and their beautiful colors coupled with their slow-moving propulsion make them relaxing to observe.

About Jellyfish

Jellyfish are invertebrates that inhabit ocean environments and are one of the oldest species of animals. They have inhabited the world’s oceans for millions of years and even pre-date dinosaurs.

Jellyfish get their name from a jelly-like body, which is generally shaped like a bell. Suspended from the body are tentacles, which vary in number and size from species to species.

Many species of jellyfish have stingers present on their tentacles that they use as self-defense and to trap their prey. The stingers are often toxic and render the prey immobile. The prey is then passed up along the length of the tentacles and is fed into a small opening at the bottom of the bell-shaped body.

Jellyfish Range

Jellyfish are found in every ocean in the world and are mainly passive drifters, meaning they do not actively control their destination. Although they can propel themselves for short distances, they do not possess the power to control their direction for long distances. The sea nettles seen on this jellyfish cam can be found on the coastlines of Oregon, California and Baja Mexico.

Jellyfish Stings

Jellyfish catch their prey using stinging cells called nematocysts. When these special cells come in contact with another animal, they explode and send a lance into the victim. The lance then injects venom into the blood stream.

The effect of jellyfish venom on humans varies greatly from species to species. Some jellyfish stings are hardly noticeable by humans, while others leave a red rash and a mild pain. Some jellies, like the box jellyfish found off the coast of the Philippines and Australia, are deadly.

Vinegar is a common home remedy used to treat jellyfish stings on humans. The vinegar, which is about 5% acidic, neutralizes the nematocysts before they can inject venom into the skin.

Jellyfish Reproduction

Jellyfish have two stages in their life cycle: the “polyp” stage and the “medusa” stage. The large, colorful jellyfish you see on the live jellyfish cam are in the medusa stage.

During reproduction, when jellyfish sperm fertilizes an egg, a planula is formed. The planula is similar to a larva and floats in the ocean until it attaches to the sea floor, plant, coral or another undersea structure. The planula then becomes a polyp, which looks something like a sea anemone; a stalky body with tentacles that face upwards.

As they grow, the jellyfish polyp eventually detaches from the structure and enters the medusa stage. In this stage, their tentacles hang down from their body.

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