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ribbon dragons

Despite their common name, Ribbon Dragons are not true sea dragons but rather pipefish. They live in the shallow tropical seas of Australia and Indonesia. Using their prehensile tails to attach to seagrass, they search for prey, consisting mostly of planktonic crustaceans.

Ribbon dragons are bottom dwellers, making their home in seaweed or seagrass beds and feeding on mysid shrimp and other tiny animals. They can grow up to nearly 12 inches long and range from greenish-yellow to brownish-red in color with white spots and feathery appendages.

Male ribbon dragons incubate their eggs in a specialized brood pouch located on the underside of their bodies. It takes about two weeks for the babies to fully develop. When the babies begin to hatch, the male twists and turns his body to release them from his pouch.

  • grant: $468,000 - Aquarium of the Pacific

    To support the Aquarium’s educational programs and research projects.

  • topic: marine life

  • location: long beach

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aquarium of the pacific

Ribbon Dragons at Aquarium of the Pacific

Related Links · Aquarium of the Pacific
The Aquarium has eight leafy and twenty-five weedy sea dragons. Because she feeds them between four and six times a day, aquarist Jen Elroycan tell the leafy sea dragons apart.

The sea dragon exhibits are the only places at the Aquarium where flash photography is prohibited because of the animals' sensitivity to changes in light.

Aquarists at the Aquarium of the Pacific care for three types of seahorses. Pacific seahorses, Pot-bellied seahorses, and Lined seahorses.

The aquarists raise these seahorses behind the scenes and cultivate some of the tiny animals that the syngnathids eat.

about

location: Long Beach, CA

best hours: 8:00am - 7:00pm

time zone: Pacific Time

links: Aquarium of the Pacific
Species Overview

grants

NGO: Aquarium of the Pacific

grant: $468,000

location: Long Beach

mission: To support the Aquarium’s educational programs and research projects.

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Despite their common name, Ribbon Dragons are not true sea dragons but rather pipefish. They live in the shallow tropical seas of Australia and Indonesia. Using their prehensile tails to attach to seagrass, they search for prey, consisting mostly of planktonic crustaceans.

Ribbon dragons are bottom dwellers, making their home in seaweed or seagrass beds and feeding on mysid shrimp and other tiny animals. They can grow up to nearly 12 inches long and range from greenish-yellow to brownish-red in color with white spots and feathery appendages.

Male ribbon dragons incubate their eggs in a specialized brood pouch located on the underside of their bodies. It takes about two weeks for the babies to fully develop. When the babies begin to hatch, the male twists and turns his body to release them from his pouch.