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atlantic puffin burrow cam - baby puffins | explore.org

Explore’s Puffin Cam features Atlantic Puffins on Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge in the Gulf of Maine.

Atlantic Puffins are often mistaken for another sea-worthy bird: penguins. Although they have similar appearances and both live in cold environments, puffins and penguins are distributed in different hemispheres. Puffins are endemic native to the northern hemisphere and penguins to the southern hemisphere.

Atlantic Puffins are superb swimmers and do not come to land outside of the breeding season; the fly, swim or ride the ocean surface throughout the year regardless of weather. Their broad wings thrust them through the water and allow them to dive to impressive depths of up to 180 feet while hunting for small fish including herring, hake, capelin and sand lance.

Unlike penguins, puffins can fly, reaching speeds of up to 50 mph in the air.

The Atlantic Puffin is the only species of puffin found on the Atlantic coast. The three other species of puffin are found only in the Pacific.

Each spring, Atlantic Puffins come ashore to make nests and breed. Rocky beaches, inaccessible cliffs, and isolated areas are favorite choices for puffins’ nests because of the obstacles the terrain pose to predators.

Puffins often reunite with the same mate year after year. Incredibly, puffin mates are able to navigate to the same nesting spot after spending the winter and fall apart at sea.

These colorful pigeon-sized birds lay one egg in their burrow homes, with the male and female sharing incubation duties for approximately 39-43 days, which you will be able to view on the live puffin cam. After the chick hatches both parents feed it fish for approximately 45 days. After that the “puffling” is large enough to fledge (leave the nest.)

  • grant: $500,000 - National Audubon Society, Inc.

    To support Seabird Restoration Program activities in Maine

  • topic: puffin

  • location: seal island

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Best Viewing Hours
5am - 9pm ET

Learn More & Get Involved · Join Audubon
· Subscribe to Audubon Wingspan
· Learn about our Audubon Camp
· Adopt-A-Puffin
· Project Puffin Visitor Center
· Puffin Watching Tour


Atlantic Puffins spend most of their time at sea — coming to land each spring to breed in colonies on northern coastal islands, like Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge in Maine, home to the puffins visible on our "puffin burrow" live Puffin Cam. The burrow is where puffins come to make nests, lay eggs and raise their young.

The Audubon Puffin web cameras are located 20 miles off of Rockland, Maine. Broadcasting the live video from the Puffin Cam on the island to the Internet is a complex process that involves beaming the signal 26 miles from Seal Island to a radio tower above Rockland. The signal is then relayed an additional 2.5 miles to the top of the Tradewinds Motor Inn in Rockland, where a rooftop dish transfers the video signal to a cable that runs into the Project Puffin Visitor Center, from there it is relayed to the Internet. The video stream is occasionally affected by factors such as changes in tide, reflection off the sea surface and dense fog. During these times the live Puffin Cam video may be lost. If this happens, stay tuned and the video signal will be restored quickly.

about

location: Seal Island, Maine

best hours: 24/7 (with infrared lighting)

time zone: Eastern Time

links: Join Audubon
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Learn about our Audubon Camp
Support Project Puffin

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Visit our blog for regular updates, photos and video highlights from Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. Also subscribe to our RSS feed available here.

Explore’s Puffin Cam features Atlantic Puffins on Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge in the Gulf of Maine.

Atlantic Puffins are often mistaken for another sea-worthy bird: penguins. Although they have similar appearances and both live in cold environments, puffins and penguins are distributed in different hemispheres. Puffins are endemic native to the northern hemisphere and penguins to the southern hemisphere.

Atlantic Puffins are superb swimmers and do not come to land outside of the breeding season; the fly, swim or ride the ocean surface throughout the year regardless of weather. Their broad wings thrust them through the water and allow them to dive to impressive depths of up to 180 feet while hunting for small fish including herring, hake, capelin and sand lance.

Unlike penguins, puffins can fly, reaching speeds of up to 50 mph in the air.

The Atlantic Puffin is the only species of puffin found on the Atlantic coast. The three other species of puffin are found only in the Pacific.

Each spring, Atlantic Puffins come ashore to make nests and breed. Rocky beaches, inaccessible cliffs, and isolated areas are favorite choices for puffins’ nests because of the obstacles the terrain pose to predators.

Puffins often reunite with the same mate year after year. Incredibly, puffin mates are able to navigate to the same nesting spot after spending the winter and fall apart at sea.

These colorful pigeon-sized birds lay one egg in their burrow homes, with the male and female sharing incubation duties for approximately 39-43 days, which you will be able to view on the live puffin cam. After the chick hatches both parents feed it fish for approximately 45 days. After that the “puffling” is large enough to fledge (leave the nest.)

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