polar bears |

tundra buggy polar bear cam

DIM
snapshot gallery

Close

tundra buggy polar bear cam

Polar bears, also called sea bears or ice bears, are found throughout the Arctic; mainly in Canada, Norway, Alaska, Greenland and Russia. They are solitary animals and highly evolved for living in frigid arctic temperatures.

Polar bear appearance

As you may witness on the live polar bear camera, winter temperatures in the arctic can reach -50º F, with little sunlight and harsh winds. Polar bears are one of the few land mammals that can survive in this climate. While their white fur keeps them camouflaged against the snow, their black skin absorbs the heat of sunlight that may pass through their coat. A layer of fat beneath the skin insulates their body further from sub-zero temperatures.

Polar bears have large and sharp claws that allow them to break through ice and kill their prey, and also provide traction while walking on the slippery ice. A long neck allows them to reach through ice and into the water while hunting. Keep an eye out for distinctive characteristics on bear featured on the live polar bear cam.

Polar Bears have developed incredible senses that allow them to live in arctic regions. Using a highly sensitive nose, polar bears can smell prey up to half a mile away and up to 3 feet beneath the snow. Their eyes have a protective membrane that some scientists believe shields their eyes from glare and harmful ultra-violet rays.

What do Polar Bears Eat?

Seals are the staple of a polar bear’s diet. Seal blubber is high in calories and allows a bear to develop insulating layers of fat beneath their skin. Walruses and even Beluga whales are also sometimes hunted, although much less frequently. Like many bears, polar bears also scavenge for food, often feeding on animal carcasses or human garbage, which can bring them close to human outposts. Because polar bears are not afraid of humans, they can be extremely dangerous when near human settlements.

Polar Bear Reproduction

Adult female polar bears give birth to their first litter at around 4 or 5 years age. If the mother bear is healthy, she will usually give birth to twins. In the spring, mother bears feed heavily and acquire enough calories to sustain them through the birthing process. In October or November, pregnant bears will dig a den in snowdrifts and give birth most often in December.

Newborn polar bear cubs are about 12 inches in size and weigh about one pound. Toothless and blind, they rely on their mother for nutrient milk and warmth. Several months after birth, in March or April, the family will emerge from the den and the mother will begin hunting again, having gone months without a meal. Between two and three years of age, the baby polar bears will leave the protection of their mother and begin hunting on their own.

Polar Bears and Humans

Climate change poses a serious risk to the long-term survival of polar bears. Rising temperatures have lead to a loss of critical sea ice habitat for polar bears and the seals they prey on. Some southern populations of bears now go months without a meal and are not healthy enough to breed or sustain a litter.

Starving polar bears are driven to eat within human settlements where they forage for garbage. Unfortunately, polar bears that come into close contact with humans are sometimes put down. By watching the live polar bear camera and supporting Polar Bears International, you can help contribute to the longevity of these polar bear populations.



Best Viewing Hours
9:30am - 4:00pm CT

Learn More & Get Involved · Polar Bears International
· Save Our Sea Ice
· Adopt a Polar Bear
· See Polar Bears in the Wild Join us on a virtual trip on a Tundra Buggy to see the polar bear migration near Churchill, Manitoba with Polar Bears International and Frontiers North Adventures.

Every Fall, Churchill’s polar bears gather along the shores of Hudson Bay to wait for the ice to form so they can return to their seal-hunting grounds. During that time, they’re in a state known as walking hibernation. But freeze-ups are coming later each year—and melt-offs sooner—straining the limits of their fat reserves. That’s why this population is considered the most endangered. It’s up to us to take action to help them.

  • grant: $1,600,000 - Polar Bears International

    For the Siku Cam Project as part of the My Planet, My Part Campaign and Tundra Connections program, and for general operating support. Grants between 2011-2012.

  • topic: polar bears

  • location: churchill

Take snapshot
Info POP Screen

live polar bear cam info

Polar Bear International Logo for Live Cam

Join us on a virtual trip on a Tundra Buggy to see the polar bear migration near Churchill, Manitoba with Polar Bears International and Frontiers North Adventures.

Every Fall, Churchill’s polar bears gather along the shores of Hudson Bay to wait for the ice to form so they can return to their seal-hunting grounds. During that time, they’re in a state known as walking hibernation. But freeze-ups are coming later each year—and melt-offs sooner—straining the limits of their fat reserves. That’s why this population is considered the most endangered. It’s up to us to take action to help them.

Our live polar bear cam will bring get you bring close to these incredible creatures.

about

location: Churchill, Canada

best hours: 9:30am - 4:00pm

time zone: Central Time

links: Polar Bears International
Save Our Sea Ice
Adopt a Polar Bear
See Polar Bears in the Wild

grants

NGO: Polar Bears International

grant: $1,600,000

location: Manitoba

mission: For the Siku Cam Project as part of the My Planet, My Part Campaign and Tundra Connections program, and for general operating support. Grants between 2011-2012.

1 / 12

Polar bears, also called sea bears or ice bears, are found throughout the Arctic; mainly in Canada, Norway, Alaska, Greenland and Russia. They are solitary animals and highly evolved for living in frigid arctic temperatures.

Polar bear appearance

As you may witness on the live polar bear camera, winter temperatures in the arctic can reach -50º F, with little sunlight and harsh winds. Polar bears are one of the few land mammals that can survive in this climate. While their white fur keeps them camouflaged against the snow, their black skin absorbs the heat of sunlight that may pass through their coat. A layer of fat beneath the skin insulates their body further from sub-zero temperatures.

Polar bears have large and sharp claws that allow them to break through ice and kill their prey, and also provide traction while walking on the slippery ice. A long neck allows them to reach through ice and into the water while hunting. Keep an eye out for distinctive characteristics on bear featured on the live polar bear cam.

Polar Bears have developed incredible senses that allow them to live in arctic regions. Using a highly sensitive nose, polar bears can smell prey up to half a mile away and up to 3 feet beneath the snow. Their eyes have a protective membrane that some scientists believe shields their eyes from glare and harmful ultra-violet rays.

What do Polar Bears Eat?

Seals are the staple of a polar bear’s diet. Seal blubber is high in calories and allows a bear to develop insulating layers of fat beneath their skin. Walruses and even Beluga whales are also sometimes hunted, although much less frequently. Like many bears, polar bears also scavenge for food, often feeding on animal carcasses or human garbage, which can bring them close to human outposts. Because polar bears are not afraid of humans, they can be extremely dangerous when near human settlements.

Polar Bear Reproduction

Adult female polar bears give birth to their first litter at around 4 or 5 years age. If the mother bear is healthy, she will usually give birth to twins. In the spring, mother bears feed heavily and acquire enough calories to sustain them through the birthing process. In October or November, pregnant bears will dig a den in snowdrifts and give birth most often in December.

Newborn polar bear cubs are about 12 inches in size and weigh about one pound. Toothless and blind, they rely on their mother for nutrient milk and warmth. Several months after birth, in March or April, the family will emerge from the den and the mother will begin hunting again, having gone months without a meal. Between two and three years of age, the baby polar bears will leave the protection of their mother and begin hunting on their own.

Polar Bears and Humans

Climate change poses a serious risk to the long-term survival of polar bears. Rising temperatures have lead to a loss of critical sea ice habitat for polar bears and the seals they prey on. Some southern populations of bears now go months without a meal and are not healthy enough to breed or sustain a litter.

Starving polar bears are driven to eat within human settlements where they forage for garbage. Unfortunately, polar bears that come into close contact with humans are sometimes put down. By watching the live polar bear camera and supporting Polar Bears International, you can help contribute to the longevity of these polar bear populations.



Best Viewing Hours
9:30am - 4:00pm CT

Learn More & Get Involved · Polar Bears International
· Save Our Sea Ice
· Adopt a Polar Bear
· See Polar Bears in the Wild Join us on a virtual trip on a Tundra Buggy to see the polar bear migration near Churchill, Manitoba with Polar Bears International and Frontiers North Adventures.

Every Fall, Churchill’s polar bears gather along the shores of Hudson Bay to wait for the ice to form so they can return to their seal-hunting grounds. During that time, they’re in a state known as walking hibernation. But freeze-ups are coming later each year—and melt-offs sooner—straining the limits of their fat reserves. That’s why this population is considered the most endangered. It’s up to us to take action to help them.

Close