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peregrine falcon - chesapeake conservancy

High on the 33rd floor of the Transamerica skyscraper in downtown Baltimore, live peregrine falcon couple Boh & Barb. The pair have nested here for years, successfully raising broods above the bustling skyline. Join them this season as they mate, lay eggs, swoop in on prey and nurture their young.

After a drastic population decline from 1950-1970 due to pesticide poisoning, peregrine populations have rebounded due to a large-scale captive breeding and release program. Boh & Barb’s home on the Transamerica tower located at 100 Light Street, has been a nesting site for peregrine falcons for over 35 years and has been a key component in the species’ recovery.

Found on every continent except Antarctica, peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) are one of the best known conservation success stories and are believed to be the fastest bird in the world, traveling up to 200 mph during hunts. These amazing birds have recovered from near eradication in eastern North America, now making many large cities and coastal areas their homes. Falcon Breeding Behavior

Peregrine Falcons mate for life and generally use the same nesting site year after year. When breeding couples return north after spending winter in warmer southern climates, they reestablish their bond through courtship behavior. The male falcon will often perform a “mating dance” while flying. This flight will include dramatic dives, turns and acrobatics in order to impress the female.

Later in the courtship, the male falcon will bring food to the female, thus demonstrating his hunting skill and ability to provide for the soon-to-be family.

Viewers of the live falcon nest camera may also notice a bizarre courtship ritual called “bowing”, in which the falcon couple faces each other and takes turns lowering their heads towards each other while vocalizing a series of soft sounds.

Falcon Mating

The female is the dominant partner falcon relationships. Not only does the female decide where the nest will be, she only decides when the mating will begin.

Mating generally begins eight weeks after the onset of courtship, and about three weeks before laying the fertilized eggs. During the breeding season, some Peregrine Falcon couples have been observed mating up to 10 times a day, as often as every 30 minutes.

When the female is ready to mate, she will perch herself on a ledge and raise her tail. The male falcon mounts from behind, the action averages between 8 and 10 seconds. After copulation, the female may choose to delay the fertilization of the eggs by storing sperm in specialized tubes in the reproductive organ. Females may choose to delay fertilization until the couple finds a suitable nest site or they feel they are in a safe territory free of threats from other raptors.

Falcon Nests and Eggs

Viewers of the falcon nest camera will notice that falcons do not build traditional bird nests, rather, they create “scrapes”, or depressions in gravel or sand, or in this case, on a rooftop in Baltimore. An average scrape is about nine inches wide and two inches deep.

The clutch size usually consists of 3-4 eggs. Egg colors vary slightly depending on the mating couple, but are often creamy or brown-colored, with red or brown dots.

Falcon Incubation

Both of the parents incubate the eggs, although the females spend more time atop the eggs, while the male spends more time hunting.

Eggs hatch after about 30 -35 days, brooding lasts for ten days, and fledging begins six weeks after hatching. After their first flight, the young falcons will remain in the nest for about four weeks, relying on their parents for food.

60% of falcons do not survive to adulthood.

  • topic: falcons

  • location: baltimore

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Chesapeake Conservancy logo for peregrine falcon cam

High on the 33rd floor of the Transamerica skyscraper in downtown Baltimore, live peregrine falcon couple Boh & Barb. The pair have nested here for years, successfully raising broods above the bustling skyline. Join them this season as they mate, lay eggs, swoop in on prey and nurture their young.

After a drastic population decline from 1950-1970 due to pesticide poisoning, peregrine populations have rebounded due to a large-scale captive breeding and release program. Boh & Barb’s home on the Transamerica tower located at 100 Light Street, has been a nesting site for peregrine falcons for over 35 years and has been a key component in the species’ recovery.

Found on every continent except Antarctica, peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) are one of the best known conservation success stories and are believed to be the fastest bird in the world, traveling up to 200 mph during hunts. These amazing birds have recovered from near eradication in eastern North America, now making many large cities and coastal areas their homes.

about

location: Baltimore, Maryland

best hours: 24/7

time zone: Eastern Time

links: Chesapeake Conservancy
Peregrine Falcon Fact Sheet
Audubon “A High Rise for Peregrines”
Skyscrapers’ Peregrines

High on the 33rd floor of the Transamerica skyscraper in downtown Baltimore, live peregrine falcon couple Boh & Barb. The pair have nested here for years, successfully raising broods above the bustling skyline. Join them this season as they mate, lay eggs, swoop in on prey and nurture their young.

After a drastic population decline from 1950-1970 due to pesticide poisoning, peregrine populations have rebounded due to a large-scale captive breeding and release program. Boh & Barb’s home on the Transamerica tower located at 100 Light Street, has been a nesting site for peregrine falcons for over 35 years and has been a key component in the species’ recovery.

Found on every continent except Antarctica, peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) are one of the best known conservation success stories and are believed to be the fastest bird in the world, traveling up to 200 mph during hunts. These amazing birds have recovered from near eradication in eastern North America, now making many large cities and coastal areas their homes. Falcon Breeding Behavior

Peregrine Falcons mate for life and generally use the same nesting site year after year. When breeding couples return north after spending winter in warmer southern climates, they reestablish their bond through courtship behavior. The male falcon will often perform a “mating dance” while flying. This flight will include dramatic dives, turns and acrobatics in order to impress the female.

Later in the courtship, the male falcon will bring food to the female, thus demonstrating his hunting skill and ability to provide for the soon-to-be family.

Viewers of the live falcon nest camera may also notice a bizarre courtship ritual called “bowing”, in which the falcon couple faces each other and takes turns lowering their heads towards each other while vocalizing a series of soft sounds.

Falcon Mating

The female is the dominant partner falcon relationships. Not only does the female decide where the nest will be, she only decides when the mating will begin.

Mating generally begins eight weeks after the onset of courtship, and about three weeks before laying the fertilized eggs. During the breeding season, some Peregrine Falcon couples have been observed mating up to 10 times a day, as often as every 30 minutes.

When the female is ready to mate, she will perch herself on a ledge and raise her tail. The male falcon mounts from behind, the action averages between 8 and 10 seconds. After copulation, the female may choose to delay the fertilization of the eggs by storing sperm in specialized tubes in the reproductive organ. Females may choose to delay fertilization until the couple finds a suitable nest site or they feel they are in a safe territory free of threats from other raptors.

Falcon Nests and Eggs

Viewers of the falcon nest camera will notice that falcons do not build traditional bird nests, rather, they create “scrapes”, or depressions in gravel or sand, or in this case, on a rooftop in Baltimore. An average scrape is about nine inches wide and two inches deep.

The clutch size usually consists of 3-4 eggs. Egg colors vary slightly depending on the mating couple, but are often creamy or brown-colored, with red or brown dots.

Falcon Incubation

Both of the parents incubate the eggs, although the females spend more time atop the eggs, while the male spends more time hunting.

Eggs hatch after about 30 -35 days, brooding lasts for ten days, and fledging begins six weeks after hatching. After their first flight, the young falcons will remain in the nest for about four weeks, relying on their parents for food.

60% of falcons do not survive to adulthood.