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great spirit bluff falcon cam

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great spirit bluff falcon cam

The Peregrine Falcon, sometimes called the Duck Hawk, is the most widely distributed bird of prey and is found on every continent except Antarctica. They are incredibly versatile and are able to adapt to a wide range of environments. Although falcons prefer open spaces near coastlines, they can thrive in environments like the desert and tundra. In fact, many breeding pairs of falcons reside in heavily urban areas and nest under bridges and on the top of skyscrapers. This falcon cam is located in the Mississippi Valley.

Peregrine Falcons can reach flying speeds of up to 200 mph and are renowned for their hunting prowess. Falconry, the use of falcons by humans for hunting small mammals and other birds, is believed to have originated in Mesopotamia over 4,000 years ago and continues to be a popular sport in the Middle East.

Falcons feed mostly on birds, favoring pigeons and ducks, but also eat songbirds, gulls, geese, and shorebirds. They catch their prey by conducting incredible swooping dives from above, often striking their target by surprise.

Falcon breeding habits

Falcons sometimes mate for life, and courtship involves mid-air battles between both sexes. Once a breeding area is established, falcons defend the immediate area from other birds of prey.

Most falcons do not construct traditional bird nests, but rather a simple “scrape”, or a shallow depression just deep enough to keep the eggs from rolling out. Falcon scrapes are usually found on the sides of massive cliffs, hollow trees, building roofs and even on the ground in elevated areas. They are also known to steal the nests of other large birds. Explore's falcon cam is perched on the side of a cliff.

Female falcons lay 2 – 5 eggs; incubation last 32 -35 days. Males hunt and bring food back for the female during this time. Around 40 days after hatching, the young falcons will attempt to fly.

Falcons and Humans

Like most birds of prey, falcons fell into serious decline in the 1960s and 1970s. The pesticide DDT accumulated in their prey, and after the falcons ingested it, the DDT thinned the shells of newly laid eggs, causing them to break. Fortunately, falcon populations slowly rebounded after a ban on DDT use in 1972, and it is believed that falcons have recovered to their pre-1970 levels.

Be sure to tune into the falcon cam daily to witness these young chicks develop into adult falcons.

  • location: la crescent

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falcon nest cam information

Raptor Resource Project logo for Falcon Cam

The Great Spirit Bluff peregrine falcons nest on a cliff-face near La Crescent, MN, overlooking the Mississippi River. After a winter away, this region's falcons return to the area in late February to early March, beginning courtship between early and Mid-March, and laying eggs between late March and mid-April. Hatching begins in early to mid-May, fledge generally occurs 38-40 days after that, and young disperse in late August or mid-September. The adults stay on territory until late fall. While the male and female leave at roughly the same time, they aren’t believed to migrate together.

Featured on the falcon cam are female Michelle (Band ID P/87) and male Newman (unbanded).

Peregrine falcons do not build nests out of sticks. They make scrape nests on ledges, potholes, and crevices on cliffs and buildings. This nest box is filled with pea gravel to provide a substrate that cushions and drains the eggs. Raptor Resource installed it in 2003; it became active in 2005 and has been productive ever since.

The Great Spirit Bluff Falcon Cam is part of a partnership between explore.org and Raptor Resource Project.

Established in 1988, the non-profit Raptor Resource Project specializes in the preservation of falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. The organization establishes and strengthens breeding populations of these raptors by creating, improving, and maintaining nests and nest sites. In addition to directly managing over 50 falcon, eagle, and owl nest sites, they provide training in nest site creation and management across the United States, reaching more than 85,000 people each year through lectures and education programs. Their work deepens the connection between people and the natural world, bringing benefits to both.

about

location: La Crescent, Minnesota

best hours: Daylight Hours

time zone: Central Standard Time

links: RRP Great Spirit Bluff Page
About Peregrine Falcons
Falcon Banding & Monitoring Reports
Education in Action

The Peregrine Falcon, sometimes called the Duck Hawk, is the most widely distributed bird of prey and is found on every continent except Antarctica. They are incredibly versatile and are able to adapt to a wide range of environments. Although falcons prefer open spaces near coastlines, they can thrive in environments like the desert and tundra. In fact, many breeding pairs of falcons reside in heavily urban areas and nest under bridges and on the top of skyscrapers. This falcon cam is located in the Mississippi Valley.

Peregrine Falcons can reach flying speeds of up to 200 mph and are renowned for their hunting prowess. Falconry, the use of falcons by humans for hunting small mammals and other birds, is believed to have originated in Mesopotamia over 4,000 years ago and continues to be a popular sport in the Middle East.

Falcons feed mostly on birds, favoring pigeons and ducks, but also eat songbirds, gulls, geese, and shorebirds. They catch their prey by conducting incredible swooping dives from above, often striking their target by surprise.

Falcon breeding habits

Falcons sometimes mate for life, and courtship involves mid-air battles between both sexes. Once a breeding area is established, falcons defend the immediate area from other birds of prey.

Most falcons do not construct traditional bird nests, but rather a simple “scrape”, or a shallow depression just deep enough to keep the eggs from rolling out. Falcon scrapes are usually found on the sides of massive cliffs, hollow trees, building roofs and even on the ground in elevated areas. They are also known to steal the nests of other large birds. Explore's falcon cam is perched on the side of a cliff.

Female falcons lay 2 – 5 eggs; incubation last 32 -35 days. Males hunt and bring food back for the female during this time. Around 40 days after hatching, the young falcons will attempt to fly.

Falcons and Humans

Like most birds of prey, falcons fell into serious decline in the 1960s and 1970s. The pesticide DDT accumulated in their prey, and after the falcons ingested it, the DDT thinned the shells of newly laid eggs, causing them to break. Fortunately, falcon populations slowly rebounded after a ban on DDT use in 1972, and it is believed that falcons have recovered to their pre-1970 levels.

Be sure to tune into the falcon cam daily to witness these young chicks develop into adult falcons.

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