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tropical reef camera

Tropical Reef Camera

This live underwater camera observes a tropical reef, which are more commonly known as coral reefs, and exist in warm water environments all over the world. Coral, also known as polyps, are made up of carbonate exoskeletons that inhabit the sea floor and can grow anywhere from one centimeter to one hundred centimeters in one full year. Over a long period time, coral eventually form massive structures. The biggest reef structure in the world is the Great Barrier Reef located off of Australia, which dates as old as 5 million years old. The coral reef featured on this live underwater camera is based on a reef in Palau.

Tropical coral reefs are known for their bright vibrant colors that can be viewed from the water’s surface. These colors are algae that have formed a symbiotic relationship with the coral. Algae feed and live off of coral and coral are able to manifest food from algae through photosynthesis. Therefore, the reason that coral reefs reside in shallow warm waters is because they need to be close to the sun in order to sustain food through photosynthesis.

Threats to Tropical Reef

Coral reef structures across the globe are rapidly declining due to the result of climate change. When the water temperature increases and gets too warm, the algae that the coral reef’s host become stressed and eventually abandon the coral. After algae’s departure, the reef is left exposed and their bone white carbonate exoskeletons are prominently displayed on the seafloor. This is known as coral bleaching and without the symbiotic relationship of algae, coral reefs die off rapidly.

Exceedingly large amounts of carbon dioxide in the air also present a threat to tropical reefs as they create acidic waters, which strip the reefs of their structure. This increase of acid in the ocean also allows for reefs to become vulnerable to disease and disease-carrying sea life that use reefs as hosts.

Tropical reefs have also decreased in number due to damaging fishing practices and exploitation of coral reef life trading. Although coral reef sea life can be traded through safe and humane practices, human greed often takes precedent over the safety and welfare of the coral reef and its inhabitants.

Tropical reefs are pivotal in creating complex ecosystems. Reefs not only provide food for several sea life but they also provide housing, a breeding ground, and shelter from predators. Thousands of species coexist peacefully in coral reefs and their disappearance in the ecosystem would prove catastrophic for many life forms, including man. By watching the live underwater reef cam, you can learn about the species without damaging natural reefs in the wild.

  • grant: $468,000 - Aquarium of the Pacific

    To support the Aquarium’s educational programs and research projects.

  • topic: marine life

  • location: long beach

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live underwater fish camera

AOTP Tropical Reef Cam logo

Related Links · Aquarium of the Pacific
The Tropical Reef Habitat is the Aquarium's largest exhibit, containing 350,000 gallons of water and over 1,000 animals. This exhibit represents the famous Blue Corner off the coast of Palau. This area, lush and abundant with life, is considered one of the most beautiful and diverse sites in the world. You may catch a diver on cam cleaning the exhibit or feeding the fish. Most divers are volunteers, donating their time to clean the exhibit, and feed the animals.

about

location: Long Beach, CA

best hours: 8:00am - 7:00pm

time zone: Pacific Time

links: Aquarium of the Pacific
Exhibit Overview

grants

NGO: Aquarium of the Pacific

grant: $468,000

location: Long Beach

mission: To support the Aquarium’s educational programs and research projects.

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Tropical Reef Camera

This live underwater camera observes a tropical reef, which are more commonly known as coral reefs, and exist in warm water environments all over the world. Coral, also known as polyps, are made up of carbonate exoskeletons that inhabit the sea floor and can grow anywhere from one centimeter to one hundred centimeters in one full year. Over a long period time, coral eventually form massive structures. The biggest reef structure in the world is the Great Barrier Reef located off of Australia, which dates as old as 5 million years old. The coral reef featured on this live underwater camera is based on a reef in Palau.

Tropical coral reefs are known for their bright vibrant colors that can be viewed from the water’s surface. These colors are algae that have formed a symbiotic relationship with the coral. Algae feed and live off of coral and coral are able to manifest food from algae through photosynthesis. Therefore, the reason that coral reefs reside in shallow warm waters is because they need to be close to the sun in order to sustain food through photosynthesis.

Threats to Tropical Reef

Coral reef structures across the globe are rapidly declining due to the result of climate change. When the water temperature increases and gets too warm, the algae that the coral reef’s host become stressed and eventually abandon the coral. After algae’s departure, the reef is left exposed and their bone white carbonate exoskeletons are prominently displayed on the seafloor. This is known as coral bleaching and without the symbiotic relationship of algae, coral reefs die off rapidly.

Exceedingly large amounts of carbon dioxide in the air also present a threat to tropical reefs as they create acidic waters, which strip the reefs of their structure. This increase of acid in the ocean also allows for reefs to become vulnerable to disease and disease-carrying sea life that use reefs as hosts.

Tropical reefs have also decreased in number due to damaging fishing practices and exploitation of coral reef life trading. Although coral reef sea life can be traded through safe and humane practices, human greed often takes precedent over the safety and welfare of the coral reef and its inhabitants.

Tropical reefs are pivotal in creating complex ecosystems. Reefs not only provide food for several sea life but they also provide housing, a breeding ground, and shelter from predators. Thousands of species coexist peacefully in coral reefs and their disappearance in the ecosystem would prove catastrophic for many life forms, including man. By watching the live underwater reef cam, you can learn about the species without damaging natural reefs in the wild.

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