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honey bees - hive camera

Honeybees

Honeybees are most well known for their ability to collaborate within hives and create honey, which many people have commercially farmed for its varied uses in the food and beauty industry. Explore takes you inside a bee hive with our live bee cam.

Honeybees are extremely social as they reside in colonies of up to several thousand other bees. During the spring and summer, the hives are most active. During the winter, the honeybees gather in a cluster in order to preserve warmth and survive off of the stored pollen and nectar that was collected during the warmer months. Within the colony, honeybees have a hierarchical society that is split into three major classes, which help manage the workflow within the hive.

Queen Bee

The queen bee is the first class of bees and each hive has one designated queen bee. The queen bee is largely in charge of laying eggs that will further populate the next generation for the hive. The queen controls the hive by emitting certain chemicals in order to regulate the social and work schedule.

If the queen bee dies, the worker bees designate one worker bee to become the next successor. They feed this newly appointed queen bee a formula known as “royal jelly” that allows for the new queen bee to be able to reproduce.

Worker Bee

Worker bees, the ones that appear most on the live bee cam, consist of only females that are not sexually developed. They are second in class to the queen bee and are responsible for a majority of the work that is needed to maintain a working hive. Worker bees go out and collect pollen and nectar from flowers and bring it back to the hive to place them in pods within the hive for future winter storage. They are also accountable for building, maintaining, and protecting the hive as well as beating their wings in order to circulate the air within the hive.

Drone Bees

The third and final class of honeybees are the drone bees. This class is entirely made up of male bees and resides within the hive during the spring and summer months. During the winter, they must leave the hive so that the queen and worker bees can survive.

Reproduction

Once the queen bee has laid her eggs, the larvae are placed inside a cell of the honeycomb wax by the worker bees. The queen bee will choose which eggs she will fertilize and all eggs that aren’t fertilized become drone bees. Larvae are all originally fed royal jelly and then eventually receive pollen and nectar. The only exception is if there is an egg that has been designated as the future queen bee and is fed royal jelly throughout the remainder of its life.

  • topic: bees

  • location: waal

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beehive camera

honey bees featured on live bee cam

Related Links · HOneyBee Online Studies
· Beekeepers School
· The swarm Exchange
Take an intimate look a life of a beehive. This infrared view of the inside of the hive shows the complex inner workings of the colony as they build combs, produce honey, protect the queen, and raise a new generation of workers and drones. Building their communal home inside a large hollow log, the hive is located in the town of Waal in Bavaria, Germany.

about

location: Waal, Bavaria Germany

best hours: 24/7

time zone: Central European Time

links: HoneyBee Online Studies
Beekeepers School
The swarm Exchange

Honeybees

Honeybees are most well known for their ability to collaborate within hives and create honey, which many people have commercially farmed for its varied uses in the food and beauty industry. Explore takes you inside a bee hive with our live bee cam.

Honeybees are extremely social as they reside in colonies of up to several thousand other bees. During the spring and summer, the hives are most active. During the winter, the honeybees gather in a cluster in order to preserve warmth and survive off of the stored pollen and nectar that was collected during the warmer months. Within the colony, honeybees have a hierarchical society that is split into three major classes, which help manage the workflow within the hive.

Queen Bee

The queen bee is the first class of bees and each hive has one designated queen bee. The queen bee is largely in charge of laying eggs that will further populate the next generation for the hive. The queen controls the hive by emitting certain chemicals in order to regulate the social and work schedule.

If the queen bee dies, the worker bees designate one worker bee to become the next successor. They feed this newly appointed queen bee a formula known as “royal jelly” that allows for the new queen bee to be able to reproduce.

Worker Bee

Worker bees, the ones that appear most on the live bee cam, consist of only females that are not sexually developed. They are second in class to the queen bee and are responsible for a majority of the work that is needed to maintain a working hive. Worker bees go out and collect pollen and nectar from flowers and bring it back to the hive to place them in pods within the hive for future winter storage. They are also accountable for building, maintaining, and protecting the hive as well as beating their wings in order to circulate the air within the hive.

Drone Bees

The third and final class of honeybees are the drone bees. This class is entirely made up of male bees and resides within the hive during the spring and summer months. During the winter, they must leave the hive so that the queen and worker bees can survive.

Reproduction

Once the queen bee has laid her eggs, the larvae are placed inside a cell of the honeycomb wax by the worker bees. The queen bee will choose which eggs she will fertilize and all eggs that aren’t fertilized become drone bees. Larvae are all originally fed royal jelly and then eventually receive pollen and nectar. The only exception is if there is an egg that has been designated as the future queen bee and is fed royal jelly throughout the remainder of its life.

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