bird cams |

audubon guillemot burrow - seabird nest cam

DIM
snapshot gallery

Close

audubon guillemot burrow - seabird nest cam

Black Guillemots are medium-sized seabirds with black feathers and white patches on their wings.

Black Guillemot Range

Black guillemots tend to inhabit inshore waters and come to land only to breed. Their nesting sites are usually rocky beaches, cliffs or islands. Sites with lots of vegetation are unsuitable for nesting as they might serve as habitat for predators like rats or minks.

The waters surrounding Alaska, the northeast of the continental US and Canada are the extent of their range.

Black Guillemot Diet

Like their puffin cousins, guillemots dive under the water to hunt, though puffins dive much deeper. The diet of guillemots varies from location and the season. In general, northern populations of guillemots eat crustaceans, isopods, and crabs. Southern populations eat mainly shallow water fish such as butterfish, sculpin, cod, and gobies.

Nesting

Black Guillemots gather in the summer to form breeding colonies. The female lays conical-shaped eggs, which helps to prevent the egg from rolling out of the nest. Guillemot chicks fledge just after a few weeks and then begin their life at sea accompanied by an adult male. After a couple of months, the juvenile guillemot will be mature enough to leave the protection of the adult male.

  • grant: $500,000 - National Audubon Society, Inc.

    To support Seabird Restoration Program activities in Maine

  • topic: guillemot

  • location: seal island

Take snapshot
Info POP Screen

about the guillemot burrow cam

Guillemot Seabird camera

Welcome to the Guillemot Burrow cam at Seal Island NWR – the only one like it in the world. Black Guillemots, like their puffin cousins, spend their life at sea, coming to land each year to nest in rock crevices and shallow burrows. But unlike puffins, Maine guillemots usually lay two eggs to the puffins’ one. It takes about 32 days for the little black guillemot chick to hatch, and within a day can scramble about in the burrow. The parents feed their chicks ribbon-like rock eels and other bottom dwelling fish, captured by the auks in dives of nearly 70 feet deep. The proximity and reliability of fish near Seal Island allow the guillemots to increase their egg viability; in contrast, puffins may carry their food from favored fishing areas 20 miles or more from the nesting island. Best Viewing Hours
24/7

Learn More & Get Involved · Join Audubon
· Subscribe to Audubon Wingspan
· Learn about our Audubon Camp
· Adopt-A-Puffin
· Project Puffin Visitor Center
· Puffin Watching Tour

about

location: Seal Island, Maine

best hours: 24/7

time zone: Eastern Time

links: Join Audubon
Subscribe to the Audubon Newsletter
Learn about our Audubon Camp
Support Project Puffin

puffin blog

Visit our blog for regular updates, photos and video highlights from Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. Also subscribe to our RSS feed available here.

Black Guillemots are medium-sized seabirds with black feathers and white patches on their wings.

Black Guillemot Range

Black guillemots tend to inhabit inshore waters and come to land only to breed. Their nesting sites are usually rocky beaches, cliffs or islands. Sites with lots of vegetation are unsuitable for nesting as they might serve as habitat for predators like rats or minks.

The waters surrounding Alaska, the northeast of the continental US and Canada are the extent of their range.

Black Guillemot Diet

Like their puffin cousins, guillemots dive under the water to hunt, though puffins dive much deeper. The diet of guillemots varies from location and the season. In general, northern populations of guillemots eat crustaceans, isopods, and crabs. Southern populations eat mainly shallow water fish such as butterfish, sculpin, cod, and gobies.

Nesting

Black Guillemots gather in the summer to form breeding colonies. The female lays conical-shaped eggs, which helps to prevent the egg from rolling out of the nest. Guillemot chicks fledge just after a few weeks and then begin their life at sea accompanied by an adult male. After a couple of months, the juvenile guillemot will be mature enough to leave the protection of the adult male.

Close