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great horned owl cam

The live owl cam features a Great Horned Owl: A powerful and adaptable bird of prey that has the most extensive range, the widest prey base and the most variable nesting sites of any American owl. Its large yellow eyes, pronounced ear tufts, and white bib distinguish the Great Horned Owl from related species, especially once its unmistakable multi-tone hoot is heard.

Silently gliding from perch to perch, the Great Horned Owl hunts easily after dark. While perched and ready to pounce, the Great Horned Owl is robustly equipped with excellent eyesight, the ability to swivel its head more than 180 degrees, and an acute sense of hearing to locate its prey.

As observers of the live owl cam may witness, Great Horned Owls regularly consume small mammals and are also known to eat fish and even large prey such as other owls or raptorial birds.

How is an owl a successful predator?

An owl’s physiology is different than most birds’ as its eyes take up the majority of its face. With eyes taking up the mass of the surface, there is no room left for muscles. Therefore, in order for an owl to look around it must twist its neck or body. Owls are able to twist their necks around 270 degrees. With their large eyes, they are able to pick up the sight of very small rodents and insects scattered along the floor. Along with their large eyes, owls have ears that give them the amazing ability to hear a twig break from up to 75 feet away. Look for these distinguishing features while watching the Great Horned Owl cam.

Another reason that owls are so successful when hunting at night is due to the construct of their feathers. Most birds have feathers with sharp edges effectively producing a wafting in the air and drawing attention. Owls have feathers with soft edges, which allow them to fly low to the ground to hunt undetected.

An owl does not have teeth so when it wants to eat its prey it must either swallow it whole or break it up into little pieces. Since owls cannot digest bones and hair it will cough up the remains into what is known as a cast.

Mating and Early Life

Owls are not pack creatures and in fact can be very territorial. Therefore owls eat, hunt, and live alone most of their lives. You may notice that the Great Horned Owl Camera often shows a single owl.

When an owl is ready to mate, it will begin “who-ing” in order to alert any other mature owls around the area that it is, in fact, a viable mate. Since owls are lone creatures, when a male owl courts a female owl it tends to be a tedious process until one can learn to trust the other. Once trust is gained, reproduction is based on how much food is readily available. Most owls produce 2-6 eggs but there have been times that owls can produce up to 14 eggs. Once eggs are ready to hatch, they hatch within two days of each other and stay with both the mother and father until about three months of age. Once old enough to live on its own, an owl will look for a home in either an abandoned nest, a hole in a tree, or if they reside in a treeless location, an established burrow in the ground.

  • grant: $50,000 - Owl Research Center

    For more than 25 years, the Owl Research Institute (ORI) has been dedicated to scientific research of owls — their ecology, natural history, and habitat relationships.

  • topic: owls

  • location: charlo

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live owl cam information

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The mission of the Owl Research Institute is three-fold:

RESEARCH To study the ecology of owls and their communities and to provide information about their life and natural histories

EDUCATION

To share our research and supply tools for informed stewardship

CONSERVATION

To inspire public interest in wildlife research and conservation

about

location: Charlo, Montana

best hours: 7:00am - 7:30pm

time zone: Mountain Time

links: Owl Research Institute
About Owls
Owl ID Guide
Support Owl Research

The live owl cam features a Great Horned Owl: A powerful and adaptable bird of prey that has the most extensive range, the widest prey base and the most variable nesting sites of any American owl. Its large yellow eyes, pronounced ear tufts, and white bib distinguish the Great Horned Owl from related species, especially once its unmistakable multi-tone hoot is heard.

Silently gliding from perch to perch, the Great Horned Owl hunts easily after dark. While perched and ready to pounce, the Great Horned Owl is robustly equipped with excellent eyesight, the ability to swivel its head more than 180 degrees, and an acute sense of hearing to locate its prey.

As observers of the live owl cam may witness, Great Horned Owls regularly consume small mammals and are also known to eat fish and even large prey such as other owls or raptorial birds.

How is an owl a successful predator?

An owl’s physiology is different than most birds’ as its eyes take up the majority of its face. With eyes taking up the mass of the surface, there is no room left for muscles. Therefore, in order for an owl to look around it must twist its neck or body. Owls are able to twist their necks around 270 degrees. With their large eyes, they are able to pick up the sight of very small rodents and insects scattered along the floor. Along with their large eyes, owls have ears that give them the amazing ability to hear a twig break from up to 75 feet away. Look for these distinguishing features while watching the Great Horned Owl cam.

Another reason that owls are so successful when hunting at night is due to the construct of their feathers. Most birds have feathers with sharp edges effectively producing a wafting in the air and drawing attention. Owls have feathers with soft edges, which allow them to fly low to the ground to hunt undetected.

An owl does not have teeth so when it wants to eat its prey it must either swallow it whole or break it up into little pieces. Since owls cannot digest bones and hair it will cough up the remains into what is known as a cast.

Mating and Early Life

Owls are not pack creatures and in fact can be very territorial. Therefore owls eat, hunt, and live alone most of their lives. You may notice that the Great Horned Owl Camera often shows a single owl.

When an owl is ready to mate, it will begin “who-ing” in order to alert any other mature owls around the area that it is, in fact, a viable mate. Since owls are lone creatures, when a male owl courts a female owl it tends to be a tedious process until one can learn to trust the other. Once trust is gained, reproduction is based on how much food is readily available. Most owls produce 2-6 eggs but there have been times that owls can produce up to 14 eggs. Once eggs are ready to hatch, they hatch within two days of each other and stay with both the mother and father until about three months of age. Once old enough to live on its own, an owl will look for a home in either an abandoned nest, a hole in a tree, or if they reside in a treeless location, an established burrow in the ground.

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