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One of the many species of fish that inhabit the waters surrounding the Frying Pan tower is the barracuda.

Barracudas

A barracuda is a saltwater fish that lives in primarily tropical and subtropical waters. Ranging along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea, barracudas are recognized by their long and slender bodies that glide through the water. Their coloring varies but they are usually primarily silver with blue or brownish spots along their sides. They have large and long mouths with razor-sharp teeth that make them a worthy predator in the sea.

Barracudas can range in size but a great barracuda have been recorded to reach lengths of six feet long. Barracudas can also swim at an impressive 27 miles per hour and live up to 15 years.

The major predators of barracudas include whales, sharks, and humans. Often hunted for food, barracudas have become popular meat for humans to consume and therefore barracudas have become hunted commercially.

Hunting and feeding

Barracudas are clever hunters as they use the art of surprise in order to overcome their prey. By using its impressive speed, a barracuda will dash towards unsuspecting prey in an attempt to stun it so it becomes immobile and therefore vulnerable to attack. It then begins a very vicious feeding by tearing chunks of the prey instead of just a few big bites. Then it swims back and forth eating the torn up pieces.

If a barracuda is not using its shock tactics to hunt, it acts as a scavenger and an opportunistic hunter. A barracuda, like a vulture, will often eat up the remains that a larger predator has already left behind from a previous kill. Often, a barracuda will follow a large predator for periods at a time until it has killed and will pick up the scraps for itself.

In fact, most dangerous interactions with humans and barracudas occur because it mistakes a human for a whale or shark and swims too close waiting for the human to hunt. A human will usually see this a threat and react poorly, causing the barracuda to feel threatened and attack.

A barracuda’s diet consists mainly of smaller fish, octopus, and shrimp.

Reproduction

There is not much knowledge about how barracudas mate and produce offspring. One of the few things scientists know is that females will lay their eggs, like most other fish, and a male will fertilize them externally. Once an offspring is born, the mother will abandon it and it will be completely on its own.

Barracudas are solitary fish and have only been known to congregate with other barracudas during youth.

  • topic: coral reefs

  • location: cape lookout shoals

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about the frying pan ocean cam

frying pan live camera

Above water overlooking the Mid-Atlantic Ocean, this camera gives us a bird’s eye view of the ocean surrounding the Frying Pan Tower. When weather moves in, you’ll see a swift change in the waves and want to watch the storm roll through. On other days, the sunrise, sunset, and expansive clouds on the horizon will be dramatic highlights to your day.

Groups travel to the Frying PanTower regularly for dive trips, volunteer restoration work, or vacation. Travel to the tower happens by boat or by helicopter, with the helicopters landing on the helipad in clear view of the camera. How do people get to the main level from a boat? They are raised by a hoist in a lift certified bosun’s chair.

about

location: 35 miles offshore from Cape Fear, NC

best hours: 6:15am - 8:00pm

time zone: Eastern Standard Time

links: Teens4Oceans
Frying Pan Tower

One of the many species of fish that inhabit the waters surrounding the Frying Pan tower is the barracuda.

Barracudas

A barracuda is a saltwater fish that lives in primarily tropical and subtropical waters. Ranging along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea, barracudas are recognized by their long and slender bodies that glide through the water. Their coloring varies but they are usually primarily silver with blue or brownish spots along their sides. They have large and long mouths with razor-sharp teeth that make them a worthy predator in the sea.

Barracudas can range in size but a great barracuda have been recorded to reach lengths of six feet long. Barracudas can also swim at an impressive 27 miles per hour and live up to 15 years.

The major predators of barracudas include whales, sharks, and humans. Often hunted for food, barracudas have become popular meat for humans to consume and therefore barracudas have become hunted commercially.

Hunting and feeding

Barracudas are clever hunters as they use the art of surprise in order to overcome their prey. By using its impressive speed, a barracuda will dash towards unsuspecting prey in an attempt to stun it so it becomes immobile and therefore vulnerable to attack. It then begins a very vicious feeding by tearing chunks of the prey instead of just a few big bites. Then it swims back and forth eating the torn up pieces.

If a barracuda is not using its shock tactics to hunt, it acts as a scavenger and an opportunistic hunter. A barracuda, like a vulture, will often eat up the remains that a larger predator has already left behind from a previous kill. Often, a barracuda will follow a large predator for periods at a time until it has killed and will pick up the scraps for itself.

In fact, most dangerous interactions with humans and barracudas occur because it mistakes a human for a whale or shark and swims too close waiting for the human to hunt. A human will usually see this a threat and react poorly, causing the barracuda to feel threatened and attack.

A barracuda’s diet consists mainly of smaller fish, octopus, and shrimp.

Reproduction

There is not much knowledge about how barracudas mate and produce offspring. One of the few things scientists know is that females will lay their eggs, like most other fish, and a male will fertilize them externally. Once an offspring is born, the mother will abandon it and it will be completely on its own.

Barracudas are solitary fish and have only been known to congregate with other barracudas during youth.

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