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great spirit bluff falcons

The Great Spirit Bluff peregrine falcons nest on a cliff-face near La Crescent, MN, overlooking the Mississippi River. After a winter away, this region's falcons return to the area in late February to early March, beginning courtship between early and Mid-March, and laying eggs between late March and mid-April. Hatching begins in early to mid-May, fledge generally occurs 38-40 days after that, and young disperse in late August or mid-September. The adults stay on territory until late fall. While the male and female leave at roughly the same time, they aren’t believed to migrate together.

Female Michelle (Band ID P/87) and male Newman (unbanded) are currently nesting here.

Peregrine falcons do not build nests out of sticks. They make scrape nests on ledges, potholes, and crevices on cliffs and buildings. This nest box is filled with pea gravel to provide a substrate that cushions and drains the eggs. Raptor Resource installed it in 2003; it became active in 2005 and has been productive ever since.

The Great Spirit Bluff Falcon Cam is part of a partnership between explore.org and Raptor Resource Project.

Established in 1988, the non-profit Raptor Resource Project specializes in the preservation of falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. The organization establishes and strengthens breeding populations of these raptors by creating, improving, and maintaining nests and nest sites. In addition to directly managing over 50 falcon, eagle, and owl nest sites, they provide training in nest site creation and management across the United States, reaching more than 85,000 people each year through lectures and education programs. Their work deepens the connection between people and the natural world, bringing benefits to both.

  • location: la crescent

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bird cams: great spirit bluff falcons

The Great Spirit Bluff peregrine falcons nest on a cliff-face near La Crescent, MN, overlooking the Mississippi River. After a winter away, this region's falcons return to the area in late February to early March, beginning courtship between early and Mid-March, and laying eggs between late March and mid-April. Hatching begins in early to mid-May, fledge generally occurs 38-40 days after that, and young disperse in late August or mid-September. The adults stay on territory until late fall. While the male and female leave at roughly the same time, they aren’t believed to migrate together.

Female Michelle (Band ID P/87) and male Newman (unbanded) are currently nesting here.

Peregrine falcons do not build nests out of sticks. They make scrape nests on ledges, potholes, and crevices on cliffs and buildings. This nest box is filled with pea gravel to provide a substrate that cushions and drains the eggs. Raptor Resource installed it in 2003; it became active in 2005 and has been productive ever since.

The Great Spirit Bluff Falcon Cam is part of a partnership between explore.org and Raptor Resource Project.

Established in 1988, the non-profit Raptor Resource Project specializes in the preservation of falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. The organization establishes and strengthens breeding populations of these raptors by creating, improving, and maintaining nests and nest sites. In addition to directly managing over 50 falcon, eagle, and owl nest sites, they provide training in nest site creation and management across the United States, reaching more than 85,000 people each year through lectures and education programs. Their work deepens the connection between people and the natural world, bringing benefits to both.

about

location: La Crescent, Minnesota

best hours: Daylight Hours

time zone: Central Standard Time

links: RRP Great Spirit Bluff Page
About Peregrine Falcons
Falcon Banding & Monitoring Reports
Education in Action

The Great Spirit Bluff peregrine falcons nest on a cliff-face near La Crescent, MN, overlooking the Mississippi River. After a winter away, this region's falcons return to the area in late February to early March, beginning courtship between early and Mid-March, and laying eggs between late March and mid-April. Hatching begins in early to mid-May, fledge generally occurs 38-40 days after that, and young disperse in late August or mid-September. The adults stay on territory until late fall. While the male and female leave at roughly the same time, they aren’t believed to migrate together.

Female Michelle (Band ID P/87) and male Newman (unbanded) are currently nesting here.

Peregrine falcons do not build nests out of sticks. They make scrape nests on ledges, potholes, and crevices on cliffs and buildings. This nest box is filled with pea gravel to provide a substrate that cushions and drains the eggs. Raptor Resource installed it in 2003; it became active in 2005 and has been productive ever since.

The Great Spirit Bluff Falcon Cam is part of a partnership between explore.org and Raptor Resource Project.

Established in 1988, the non-profit Raptor Resource Project specializes in the preservation of falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. The organization establishes and strengthens breeding populations of these raptors by creating, improving, and maintaining nests and nest sites. In addition to directly managing over 50 falcon, eagle, and owl nest sites, they provide training in nest site creation and management across the United States, reaching more than 85,000 people each year through lectures and education programs. Their work deepens the connection between people and the natural world, bringing benefits to both.

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