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bald eagle cam live - decorah, iowa

When the newly formed United States set out to create a national seal in the late 18th century, a committee of emblem designers sought to find an animal that represented strength, agility, and dominance. Eventually, the bald eagle was selected and it became the national bird of the United States in 1782.

Despite being the symbol of the nation, the American people did not do much to protect bald eagles. By the 1970s, the bald eagle was on the brink of extirpation (local extinction) in the United States because of over hunting and pesticide use by humans. Fishermen would often shoot and kill bald eagles because they believed the birds were depleting fish stocks. However, it wasn’t hunters that wreaked the most havoc bald eagle populations, but the pesticide DDT.

In the middle of the 20th century, DDT chemicals were sprayed on agriculture and it would eventually drain to local rivers and lakes where it would collect in the body fish. It was then transferred to the tissue of bald eagles when they ate fish contaminated with DDT. The chemical caused eagles’ eggs to thin and break under light pressure. Thanks to Rachel Carson’s 1962 book The Silent Spring, the public knew the effects of DDT and other pesticides on humans and animals, and in 1972 the chemical was banned in the USA. The population of bald eagles and other birds of prey rebounded and in 2007 the bald eagle was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the US.

Bald eagle facts

Bald eagles are not actually bald but have white feathery head and a long, yellow, sharp beak. Like most predators, their eyes are situated on the front of the head and look forward. Female bald eagles are often larger than males and grow up to 43 inches long with an impressive wingspan of 8 feet.

Bald eagle diet and habitat

Bald eagles are primarily found in Alaska and Canada, near large bodies of water like lakes and oceans. They hunt fish that swim near the water’s surface by swooping down at a high speed and snatching the fish in their sharp talons. Bald eagles are also known for their tendency to steal fish from other birds such as ospreys, falcons, and pelicans.

By watching the live Eagle Cam you will quickly learn that the eagle’s diet is not limited to fish. Small mammals, snakes, lizards, and turtles are sometimes brought back to the nest. One bald eagle nest cam caused public debate when it showed live video of a cat being eaten by baby eagles in their nest.

Breeding

It is believed that bald eagles share the same mate for life. Their nests regularly weigh over 2000 pounds and constructed from large sticks. Generally, an eagle couple will lay two eggs per year, and the eggs will hatch in about 35 days.

  • topic: eagles

  • location: decorah

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The bald eagles of the Decorah North Nest roost high in a white oak tree in a secluded valley north of Decorah, Iowa. During the nesting season the female lays 1-3 eggs and the adult pair takes turns incubating them. Hatching about 35 days later, the eagle chicks depend on both parents for food, warmth and protection until they fledge at 10-14 of age. The eagles eat both live and dead fish, squirrels, birds, rabbit, muskrat, deer, possum and anything else they can catch or find.

Established in 1988, the non-profit Raptor Resource Project specializes in the preservation of falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. They create, improve, and directly maintain over 50 nests, provide training in nest site creation and management, and develop innovations in nest site viewing, bringing people closer to the natural world.

about

location: Decorah, Iowa

best hours: Daylight Hours

time zone: Central Standard Time

links: Raptor Resource Project
Raptor Resource Project - Facebook
Decorah North Nest Blog
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When the newly formed United States set out to create a national seal in the late 18th century, a committee of emblem designers sought to find an animal that represented strength, agility, and dominance. Eventually, the bald eagle was selected and it became the national bird of the United States in 1782.

Despite being the symbol of the nation, the American people did not do much to protect bald eagles. By the 1970s, the bald eagle was on the brink of extirpation (local extinction) in the United States because of over hunting and pesticide use by humans. Fishermen would often shoot and kill bald eagles because they believed the birds were depleting fish stocks. However, it wasn’t hunters that wreaked the most havoc bald eagle populations, but the pesticide DDT.

In the middle of the 20th century, DDT chemicals were sprayed on agriculture and it would eventually drain to local rivers and lakes where it would collect in the body fish. It was then transferred to the tissue of bald eagles when they ate fish contaminated with DDT. The chemical caused eagles’ eggs to thin and break under light pressure. Thanks to Rachel Carson’s 1962 book The Silent Spring, the public knew the effects of DDT and other pesticides on humans and animals, and in 1972 the chemical was banned in the USA. The population of bald eagles and other birds of prey rebounded and in 2007 the bald eagle was removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife in the US.

Bald eagle facts

Bald eagles are not actually bald but have white feathery head and a long, yellow, sharp beak. Like most predators, their eyes are situated on the front of the head and look forward. Female bald eagles are often larger than males and grow up to 43 inches long with an impressive wingspan of 8 feet.

Bald eagle diet and habitat

Bald eagles are primarily found in Alaska and Canada, near large bodies of water like lakes and oceans. They hunt fish that swim near the water’s surface by swooping down at a high speed and snatching the fish in their sharp talons. Bald eagles are also known for their tendency to steal fish from other birds such as ospreys, falcons, and pelicans.

By watching the live Eagle Cam you will quickly learn that the eagle’s diet is not limited to fish. Small mammals, snakes, lizards, and turtles are sometimes brought back to the nest. One bald eagle nest cam caused public debate when it showed live video of a cat being eaten by baby eagles in their nest.

Breeding

It is believed that bald eagles share the same mate for life. Their nests regularly weigh over 2000 pounds and constructed from large sticks. Generally, an eagle couple will lay two eggs per year, and the eggs will hatch in about 35 days.

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