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walrus cam - round island

Look out on Main Beach, where walruses have been gathered en masse since April, and First Beach, a favorite sleeping and chiming spot from early June on. From the cliffs high above, spot foxes, ravens, and nesting seabirds while catching breathtaking views of the waters and sunsets of Bristol Bay.

The Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary (WISGS) was established in 1960 to protect one of the largest terrestrial haulout sites in North America for Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens). The sanctuary also protects important habitats for several species of seabirds, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) and other marine and terrestrial birds and mammals. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) manages the sanctuary primarily to protect these important habitats and wildlife species.

Best known among the WISGS islands is Round Island, where each summer large numbers of male walruses haul out on exposed, rocky beaches. Round Island is one of four major terrestrial haulouts in Alaska. Male walrus return to these haulouts every spring as the ice pack recedes northward, remaining in Bristol Bay to feed they haul out at these beach sites for several days between each feeding foray. The number of walrus using the island fluctuates significantly from year to year. However, up to 14,000 walrus have been counted on Round Island in a single day.

  • topic: walrus

  • location: round island

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oceans: walrus cam - round island

Look out on Main Beach, where walruses have been gathered en masse since April, and First Beach, a favorite sleeping and chiming spot from early June on. From the cliffs high above, spot foxes, ravens, and nesting seabirds while catching breathtaking views of the waters and sunsets of Bristol Bay.

The Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary (WISGS) was established in 1960 to protect one of the largest terrestrial haulout sites in North America for Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens). The sanctuary also protects important habitats for several species of seabirds, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) and other marine and terrestrial birds and mammals. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) manages the sanctuary primarily to protect these important habitats and wildlife species.

Best known among the WISGS islands is Round Island, where each summer large numbers of male walruses haul out on exposed, rocky beaches. Round Island is one of four major terrestrial haulouts in Alaska. Male walrus return to these haulouts every spring as the ice pack recedes northward, remaining in Bristol Bay to feed they haul out at these beach sites for several days between each feeding foray. The number of walrus using the island fluctuates significantly from year to year. However, up to 14,000 walrus have been counted on Round Island in a single day.

about

location: Round Island, Alaska

best viewing hours: 6:30am - 10:30pm (May through August)

time zone: Alaska Daylight Time

related links: Walrus Islands - State Game Sanctuary
Alaska Science Center - Walrus Research
Marine Mammals Management - Walrus
Pacific Walrus Range Map

Look out on Main Beach, where walruses have been gathered en masse since April, and First Beach, a favorite sleeping and chiming spot from early June on. From the cliffs high above, spot foxes, ravens, and nesting seabirds while catching breathtaking views of the waters and sunsets of Bristol Bay.

The Walrus Islands State Game Sanctuary (WISGS) was established in 1960 to protect one of the largest terrestrial haulout sites in North America for Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens). The sanctuary also protects important habitats for several species of seabirds, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) and other marine and terrestrial birds and mammals. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) manages the sanctuary primarily to protect these important habitats and wildlife species.

Best known among the WISGS islands is Round Island, where each summer large numbers of male walruses haul out on exposed, rocky beaches. Round Island is one of four major terrestrial haulouts in Alaska. Male walrus return to these haulouts every spring as the ice pack recedes northward, remaining in Bristol Bay to feed they haul out at these beach sites for several days between each feeding foray. The number of walrus using the island fluctuates significantly from year to year. However, up to 14,000 walrus have been counted on Round Island in a single day.

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